Final Week: The Great Wall of Green

Lastly, we were given the task of uninstalling and reinstalling the existing green wall. First, we weeded the invasive grasses to disable the growth onto the new plantings. Second, we took down each module, emptied, and cleaned them out to ensure there would be no weeds for the new plants. Lastly, we installed each module with the new soil, various plant type, and fertilizer. Then, we arranged the wall according to texture, growing season, and aesthetic for an overall successful green wall.

There was evidence of pests within the wall from the over-wetness of the wood, which attracted roaches, spiders, and worms. These are all contributing factors to the positive and/or negative growth to the plants, which cannot be quantified throughout our research. So, we resealed the wall with protectants to prevent this.

Photos: Before, during, and after installation.

 

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Week Two: We Got Dirt(y)

In week two, we were given the task of creating a new module. First, we hauled a ton (literally felt like a ton) of 50 lbs. of soil bags onto the elevator from the ground floor. It was a long and arduous process and it took a while to figure out a way to methodically do so without over-weighing the elevator. We eventually figured it out.

Once all of the bags where on the roof, we laid out each empty module quartile and aligned them with the existing modules. Then, we filled them up accordingly. The base layer with the fabric followed by the soil and topped with the gravel. This process helps with the movement of water through each layer and the ability to retain at the base.

 

Photo: Soil and gravel installation to each module quartile.

Week One: We Became Farmers

The first class we got right to it. Dr. Jeremy Merrill had already bought an extensive amount of vegetables and herbs that he wanted to develop his research on. He was able to get an array of vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, squash, pumpkin, etc. that also had a variety of growth patterns and conditions. In doing so, it allowed us to observe the which were inhabitable on the roof and what wasn’t. I’ve learned the proper way to install new plantings by loosening the roots to allow flexible growth and placing them into the pre-dug slots.

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Photo: Me shearing and planting Thai Chili Peppers into random modules with different herbs and vegetables.